Garden Opening Day
Monday 28 May 2001

 

WELCOME TO LYNDON GARDENS
and to the Picture Exhibition

 

GARDEN 1
PERIWINKLE COTTAGE

This elegant and beautiful garden was laid out in 1980 by the late Lady Conant, with the help of John Codrington, the noted garden designer. The area in the north-eastern corner, of Italianate appearance, uses the remains of the old farm buildings, with the original manger. The design of the rest of the garden flows softly away from the house. There are at least 25 different species of clematis, together with roses and other shrubs. A small arboretum has been established by John and Clare Conant over the wall in the south-east corner.

GARDEN 2
6 POST OFFICE LANE

This is a delightful small cottage garden, which is full of sun and colour. It has been lovingly planned and constructed by Peggy Pratt, and is divided into two distinct areas (dog and dog-free!) Both areas provide colour and interest throughout the year.

GARDEN 3
OLD OAK COTTAGE

The name of the house is the give away! This garden is dominated by the magnificent oak at its front, against whose leaf-fall, flower-fall, acorn-fall (and pigeon-fall), Sue Anderson wages incessant but highly successful warfare. The southerly aspect shows off to great advantage Sue's beautiful bedding arrangements.

GARDEN 4
POST OFFICE COTTAGE

This cottage is reputedly the oldest in Lyndon, dating back to before 1663 when the village was first mapped. However the garden in its present form was laid out from scratch only 6 years ago. Traditional borders are shown off and framed by the Rutland stone walls, while Pauline and Clive Pitts have recently developed a more contemporary vegetable plot - the perfect spot to enjoy a glass of wine and Gardeners' Question Time!

GARDEN 5
PARSON'S ORCHARD

The garden offers two contrasting styles. The front of the house is more formal, with newly-constructed arrangements of box and gravel leading the eye to either side. Walk around the side, however (past the un-landscaped poultry area!) and the rear garden takes full advantage of the wonderful views to the south across the valley, again with much recent re-planning and construction by Mike and Sarah Peck.

GARDEN 6
BEECH HOUSE

A lovely natural garden lies at the back and side of this pretty red-brick house. It features a number of beautiful mature fruit-trees and a delightful small pond, and is in one of the quietest and most tranquil corners of Lyndon village. Celia Richards takes great pleasure in its reclamation from being more of a wilderness into a proper garden.

GARDEN 7
THE HALL

Whether you enter the grounds of Lyndon Hall down the driveway past the Lodge, or through the gates at the top of Post Office Lane, the 17th century house appears framed by mature trees and overlooks the surrounding landscape of Rutland. The grounds house a collection of over 100 species of trees, most notably the mature Taxodium distichum (Swamp Cypress), one of the finest examples in the country. There are also numerous varieties of Oak trees situated on the Estate. The old double herbaceous borders at the front of the Hall were restocked in 1999 and now contain many unusual perennials and ornamental grasses.

GARDEN 8
THE LADY'S GARDEN, LYNDON HALL

The origins of this garden lie in the Victorian era, when a small private area was set aside for the enjoyment of the ladies of the house. It gradually fell into decay and became completely overgrown and hidden, until restoration commenced in 1999. The design, by Rebecca Cotton, for Edward and Justine Conant, is contemporary rather than traditional. It has been planned and constructed making use of the few features that have survived, such as the clover-leaf pond. It is a deceptively simple garden - a gentle cascade of water emerges from a fern-covered bank, and flows along a curving stream to the restored pond. Soft drifts of Miscanthus grass follow the banks of the stream and contrast with the short mown-grass edges adjacent to the straight rills of water nearby. There are circular sculptural seating-places, surrounded by bamboo groves and a jungle complete with Gunneras and Tibetan rhubarb. A rustic summerhouse will one day overlook the bank which is flanked by the giant Austrian and Bhutan Pines.

This garden is still being developed and only when it has reached maturity will its full effect become apparent.. It is hoped however that, with an imaginative eye, its spirit and future beauty are visible.